Activities & Events


Major Conferences And Other Past Events

“Rethinking Borderlands” This was the second workshop in the bi-annual East Asian Connections series with panelists including Kathryn Ciancia (UW-Madison, History), Judd Kinzley (UW-Madison, History), and Willard Sunderland (University of Cincinnati, History). This event was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on December 3, 2015.

Click here for more information on this event.

“City/State/Nation: Historians on Twentieth Century Urbanism” This roundtable explores global forces through the lens of particular urban sites; examining ways urban forms inflect state power and national ideology, even as they express tensions between the local and the national. Participants: Sean, Dinces, working on Bulls Markets: Power, Place, and Professional Sports in Late Twentieth-Century Chicago; Emily Callaci, writing a book on Ujamaa Urbanists: Street Archives and City Life in Socialist Tanzania; Louise Young, author of Beyond the Metropolis: Second Cities and Modern Life in Interwar Japan; and Preeti Chopra, author of A Joint Enterprise: Indian Elites and the Making of British Bombay. This event was part of the bi-annual East Asian Connections series held at UW-Madison on April 17, 2015.

Click here for more information on this workshop.

“Rethinking East Asian Modernity: The Place of Cigarettes and Foreign Tobacco Companies in China” A public forum that was part of the bi-annual East Asian Connections series, featuring Carol Benedict, chair of the Department of History at Georgetown University, and Nan Enstad (UW-Madison, History). This event was held at UW-Madison on October 23-24, 2014.

"Symposium on the 50th Anniversary of the Military Coup in Brazil" A symposium on the 1964 military coup in Brazil held at the Pyle Conference Center. Presenters included Rebecca Atencio (Tulane University, Brazilian Literary and Cultural Studies), Luca Bacchini (University of Bologna, Brazilian Literature), Peter Beattie (Michigan State University, History), Jerry Dávila (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, History), Chris Dunn (Tulane University, History), Marc Hertzman (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, History), Peter Kornbluh (Senior Analyst at the National Security Archive), Victoria Langland (University of Michigan, History and Romance Languages & Literatures), and Leila Lehnen (University of New Mexico, Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies). This symposium was part of the Mellon Human Rights program held on April 3-4, 2014.

"Material Bodies/Contested Fantasies: A Graduate Student Conference" This graduate conference focused on the relationships between the material and the fantastic viewed from the lens of gender history and gender studies. This symposium featured keynote speakers Elizabeth Heineman (University of Iowa, Director of Graduate Studies and Professor of History) and Victoria Langland (University of Michigan, History and Romance Languages & Literatures). This graduate student conference was held at the UW-Madison on February 21-22, 2014.

"The Question of Zionism: A Symposium on the Left and Its Relationship to Israel" Three renowned scholars gave lectures and participated in a roundtable discussion that included Mitchell Cohen (Baruch College, Political Science), Moishe Postone (University of Chicago, History), and Barbara Epstein (University of California-Santa Cruz, History of Consciousness). This event was held at UW-Madison on April 19, 2012.

Click here for more information on this symposium.

The Elusive Truth: The Cinema of Errol Morris: From September 4 to October 22, 2010, the Goldberg Center co-sponsored the very successful ‘A Year of the Arts’ Marque Event which highlighted the films and other works by a well-known American documentary filmmaker and UW-Madison’s History Department alumnus – Mr. Errol Morris. This month-long event included series of film screenings and two public lectures by Mr. Morris entitled “Elusive Truths: Filmmaking & Politics” (21 October 2010) and “Photography & Truth” (22 October 2010). In addition, during his brief visit to Madison and his alma mater, Mr. Morris had TV interviews and a classroom visit where he addressed History Prof. Jeremi Suri’s undergraduate class to talk about his time in UW-Madison as a history student (Click Here).

"Eclipse of Empires: Colonial Resistance, Metropolitan Decline, and Imperial Crises in the XIX and XX Centuries" In June 2010, the U.S. Empire Project working group has convened another three-day international conference at Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, Spain. This conference brought together 30 leading scholars from Australia, America, Asia and Europe to interrogate the dynamics of decline among five global empires - British, French, Portuguese Spanish, and American. A compilation volume of conference papers published in 2012 edited by Alfred W. McCoy, Josep M. Fradera, and Stephen Jacobson entitled "Endless Empire: Spain's Retreat, Europe's Eclipse, America's Decline."

For the edited volume "Endless Empire: Spain's Retreat, Europe's Eclipse, America's Decline" click here. For more information on the conference and the U.S. Empire Project, click here.

For more information on the conference visit the U.S. Empire Project Page.

“Reflections on History and Contemporary Change in China Before and After Tiananmen” This major international conference honoring the long-serving China historian Maurice Meisner, Harvey Goldberg Professor of History (emeritus), was held on June 4-7, 2009 at UW-Madison. More than a dozen of Dr. Meisner’s former students, all now faculty and several holders of distinguish university chairs, presented papers to celebrate his scholarship and career and furthermore reflect on the 20th anniversary of Tiananmen Square.

Conference papers were subsequently published as compilation volume entitled, "Radicalism, Revolution, and Reform in Modern China: Essays in Honor of Maurice Meisner," edited by Catherine Lynch, Robert B. Marks, and Paul G. Pickowicz (Lexington Books, 2011).

The Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi: On June 23-24, 2007 the Goldberg Center was extremely pleased to provide transportation and lodging assistance enabling graduate students at UW-Madison to attend 43rd Annual memorial service and conference for the victims of the "Freedom Summer" murders, Philadelphia, Mississippi. The conference was titled: “The 43rd Annual Mississippi Civil Rights Martyrs Service and Caravan for Justice.”

“Transitions and Transformations in U.S. Imperial State” In November 2006, the Harvey Goldberg Center hosted a groundbreaking three-day conference titled, “Transitions and Transformations in the U.S. Imperial State.” Conference participants subsequently published a compilation volume in 2009 edited by Alfred W. McCoy and Francisco A. Scarano entitled “Colonial Crucible: Empire in the Making of the Modern American State.”

For the edited volume “Colonial Crucible: Empire in the Making of the Modern American State” Click Here

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 at 40: From April 10 to April 14, 2005, the Center and Chadbourne Residential College co-sponsored a weeklong series entitled “The U.S. Voting Rights Act of 1965 at 40: Civil Rights, Voting Rights, Human Rights--Then and Now” which featured civil rights luminaries Anne Braden, Dolores Huerta, Mary Liuzzo Lilleboe, and Diane Nash, as well as Ms. Braden's biographer, Catherine Fosl. The events included public lectures, public conversations, roundtables, and classroom visits.

The Internationalizing History Seminar Series: From 2003-2004 the Harvey Goldberg Center launched a new multiyear initiative to internationalize the study and teaching of history. Sponsored by the Harvey Goldberg Center and the George L. Mosse Program in History, this endeavor sought to stimulate a cross-fertilization of ideas across traditional geographic and methodological boundaries. Speakers included Steve Stern of University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dipesh Chakrabarty of the University of Chicago, John Lewis Gaddis of Yale University, Thomas Bender of New York University, John R. McNeill of Georgetown University, Cathy Ceniza Choy of the University of Minnesota, and Piero Gleijeses of John Hopkins University.

Click here for more information on this series.

“Community Power: First International Conference on Local Democracy” This conference, held on November 15-17, 2002 brought speakers from Brazil, Uruguay, the United Kingdom, and cities across the United States to discuss local communities' strategies for democratic rule. The conference was attended by approximately 225 people with strong representation from the campus community, including faculty and students.

“Headwaters: The Past and Future of Women's History” On 28 September 2002, Headwaters brought leading scholars in Women's History to the University of Wisconsin, Madison campus for a day-long conference organized by the Graduate Program in Women's History followed by a banquet in honor of Professor Gerda Lerner. The event took place on September 28, 2002 at the Pyle Center on the University of Wisconsin campus. Over 110 people attended the conference, which featured six renowned speakers engaging in cutting edge work in the field of women's and gender history.

Civil Rights Legends Visit Madison: On October 28-29, 2002 the Goldberg Center co-sponsored a conference that brought leaders from Milwaukee, WI and Selma, AL to Madison to discuss their roles in the Civil Rights Movement. Among the featured speakers were Rev. James Orange, Joe McClaine, and Vel Phillips. The lecture series was entitled “Voting Rights and the Road to Freedom.”

CREECA Colloquium: In 2002 the Goldberg Center helped fund a colloquium for graduate students and faculty members interested in the history of Eastern Europe, Russia and the Soviet Union. This colloquium served as a forum for students and faculty to present and get feedback on works in progress (from dissertation chapters to conference papers to articles for publication). These participants also benefited from guest presentations made by preeminent scholars of Soviet history, Amir Weiner and Steven Kotkin, two of the most respected and renowned Historians in the field.

Past Lectures

Christopher Hanscom, Associate Professor in UCLA's Department of Asian Languages and Culture, gave a talk entitled "Involuntary Resistance: Against Normalizing Society in Recent South Korean Film" as part of the Spring 2017 Korean Studies Lecture Series held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, April 11, 2017.

*Funding for this talk comes from the University Lectures Committee, with additional support from the Gail and Hyuk Yu Fund, and the Korea Foundation.  Co-sponsors include the Department of History, the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, the East Asia Graduate Student Association, and the Trans-Asia Graduate Student Conference Organizing Committee.

Jonathan Schlesinger, Assistant Professor of History at Indiana University, presented a public lecture entitled "An Inside-Out View of Qing Environmental History: On Mushrooms, Rhino Horns, and Other Frontier Objects in Chinese History," held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, March 2, 2017.

*Event co-sponsored with the Nelson's Institute's Center for Culture, History and the Environment, and the Department of History.

Daniel Gutwein, Associate Professor of Modern Jewish History at the University of Haifa, Israel, gave two public lectures "The Class Deficiency of the Israeli Left" (February 22), and "The Populist Spell of the Israeli Right" (February 23rd), held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, February 22-23, 2017.

*Event co-sponsored with Department of History, Department of Sociology, George L. Mosse Program in History, George L. Mosse / Laurence A. Weinstein Center for Jewish Studies, and The Havens Center for Social Justice.

Hans Ulrich Gumbricht, Albert Guérard Professor in Literature Departments of Comparative Literature, French and Italian, and German Studies at Stanford University, gave a talk entitled “A Different Epistemology of Enlightenment: Diderot, Goya, Lichtenberg, Mozart,” as part of the UW-Madison Intellectual History Group Lecture Series. Co-sponsored with the Department of History, The Center for European Studies, the Mosse Program in History, the Institute for Research in the Humanities, the Center for the Humanities, and the Merle Curti Fund, the event was held in the University Club at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 26, 2016.

Duncan McCargo, Professor of Political Science at the University of Leeds and Visiting Professor of Political Science at Columbia University’s Weatherhead East Asian Institute, presented a public lecture entitled “(Un)Happy Stories from Thailand’s Constitutional Court,” as part of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies’ Friday Forum Lecture Series. Co-sponsored with the UW-Madison Center for Southeast Asian Studies, this event was held in Ingraham Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on March 11, 2016.

Kate Brown, Professor of History at the University of Maryland, presented a public lecture as part of the E is for the Environment Symposium entitled "P is for Place: The Nature of Embodied History." Co-sponsored with Department of Geography, Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA), Department of History, Department of Anthropology, Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies, Department of Community & Environmental Technology, Department of Comparative Literature & Folklore Studies, Department of Gender and Women's Studies, and Wisconsin Historical Society, this event was held at the Wisconsin Historical Society at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on March 4, 2016.

Saowanee Alexander, Sociolinguist in the Department of Western Languages and Literature, Ubon Ratchathani University, Thailand, gave a talk entitled ”Who Speaks ‘Lao’ Anymore? Upward Social Mobility, Language Change, and Issues of Inequality in Northeast Thailand,” as part of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies’ Friday Forum Lecture Series. Co-sponsored with the UW-Madison Center for Southeast Asian Studies, this event was held in Ingraham Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on January 29, 2016. 

Willard Sunderland, Professor of Russian History at the University of Cincinnati, presented a public lecture entitled "Journeys with Baron Ungern: Biography and Empire in the Russian Revolution." Co-sponsored with Alice D. Mortensen/Petrovich Chair in Russian History, the George L. Mosse Program in History, the Center for Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA), the Anonymous Fund, the Institute for Research in the Humanities, this event was held at the University Club at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on December 4, 2015.

Kenneth Pomeranz, Professor of Modern Chinese History at the University of Chicago and past president of the American Historical Association, gave a talk entitled "Why is China so Big? Rethinking the Boundaries of Civilized Empire under the Qing." His talk examines conceptual changes in the late 18th and early 19th century that involved a re-thinking of physical space, helping form the concept of the modern Chinese nation state. Co-sponsored with The International Division, Wisconsin China Initiative, and the Department of History, this event was held at the Conrad A. Elvenhjem Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on November 13, 2015.

Takahiro Nakajima, a visiting assistant professor at Department of East Asian Studies at Princeton University, and holds the positions of Philosophy professor and Director of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Asia at the University of Tokyo, presented a public lecture entitled “New Universality in East Asia.” The talk discussed the recent Tianxia discourse in China and make comparisons to earlier Japanese cases. The event was held at the Department of History's Curti Lounge at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on November 6, 2015.

Mai Na Lee, Associate Professor of History and Asian Studies at the University of Minnesota, discussed her new book Dreams of the Hmong Kingdom: The Quest for Legitimation in French Indochina, 1850-1960 as a featured author at the Wisconsin Book Festival. Presented in partnership with the UW-Madison’s Mellon Sawyer Seminar and Wisconsin Book Festival, the event was held in the Madison Public Library on October 25, 2015. Co-sponsored by the UW-Madison Center for Southeast Asian Studies and Wisconsin Book Festival, she also gave a public talk entitled “Back to Zomia: Hmong-French Relations During the Colonial Era” at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies’ Friday Forum Lecture Series in Ingraham Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 23, 2015.

Laurie Sears, Walker Family Endowed Professor of History at the University of Washington, gave a public talk entitled “Critical Spirituality and a Critical Path in Ayu Utami’s Indonesian Novels” as part of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies’ Friday Forum Lecture Series. Co-sponsored with the UW-Madison Center for Southeast Asian Studies, this event was held in Ingraham Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 16, 2015. 

Werner Sollors, The Henry B. and Anne M. Cabot Professor of English Literature and African and African American Studies at Harvard University, took part in The Intellectual History Group (IHG) book reading and discussion of his 2014 work, Temptation of Despair: Tales of Life in the 1940s. This Intellectual Studies Group (IHG) event, co-sponsored with the George L. Mosse Program in History, was held at the University Club at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 7, 2015.

Harry Harootunian, Adjunct Senior Research Scholar at the Weatherhead East Asian Institute at Columbia University and Professor Emeritus of History and East Asian Studies at New York University, gave a talk entitled “Ruins, Remnants and Relics: Rethinking Temporality in an Age of Global Capitalism.” Co-sponsored University Lectures Committee, Department of Art History, Department of Geography, and Department of History, this public lecture was held at the Department of History's Curti Lounge at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 9, 2015.

Joyce White, Director of the Institute for Southeast Asian Archaeology (ISEAA), presented a lecture entitled “Hot Pots, Museum Raids, and the Race to Uncover Asia’s Archaeological Past.” This presentation focused on examples of contested ownership over material artifacts from historical and archaeological heritage sites in Southeast Asia. Co-sponsored with the Department of Anthropology and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS), the event was held at Ingraham Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on March 25, 2015.

Andrea Arai, Lecturer in East Asian Studies at the University of Washington, presenting her talk entitled “Article 9 and the Pacific: The Implications of the Japanese Government’s New Interpretation of its Constitution for the Pacific Region,” as part of the “The Return of the Japanese Military?: Symposium on the Projections for the Pacific Region organized by the East Asian Graduate Student Association . Co-sponsored with the Wisconsin Experience Grant, Wisconsin China Initiative, East Asian Language & Literature, and East Asian Legal Studies Center, this EA Graduate Student Association event was held at Memorial Union at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on March 20, 2015.

Rebecca Karl, Associate Professor in the Dept. of History and Dept. of East Asian Studies at New York University, gave a talk entitled “Semicolonialism and the Economic as Lived Experience in China’s 1930s.” Co-sponsored with the Department of History and Wisconsin China Initiative, the event was held at the Department of History's Curti Lounge at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on November 7, 2014.

Robert Pollin (UW alumnus, B.A. in History, 1972), Distinguished Professor of Economics and Co-Director of Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, gave the Harvey Goldberg Memorial Lecture entitled “The U.S. Green Energy Transformation: Controlling Climate Change and Expanding Job Opportunities.” This public lecture presented by the Department of History and the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies was held at The Pyle Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on November 6, 2014.

Amy S. Greenberg, Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of History and Women’s Studies at the Pennsylvania State University, presented a talk entitled “The Power of Submission: Sarah Childress Polk and the Origins of American Female Political Conservatism.” Co-sponsored with UW-Madison Center for the Humanities, this public lecture was held at the Department of History's Curti Lounge at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 16, 2014.

Casey Nelson Blake, Professor of History at the Columbia University, took part in a brown lunch event entitled "Historians as Critics" together with William P. Jones and Tony Michels of the UW History Department. The event was held at the Department of History's Curti Lounge at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on May 1, 2014.

Casey Nelson Blake, Professor of History at the Columbia University, gave a public lecture on "Art as Public Experience: From John Dewey to Allan Kaprow and Siah Armajani." Co-sponsored with the Department of Art History and the Merle Curti Chair Funds, the event was held at the Elvehjem Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 30, 2014.

Oliver Stone, Academy Award-winning filmmaker and Vietnam War veteran, together with Peter Kuznick, Professor of History and Director of the Nuclear Studies Institute at American University, talked about Stone’s new documentary series “The Untold History of the United States,” as part of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies’ Friday Forum Lecture Series. Dr. Alfred W. McCoy, UW Professor of History, moderated the event. Co-sponsored with the Center for Southeast Asian Studies this latter event was held in Ingraham Hall at the University of Wisconsin on April 25, 2014.

Jacques Bidet, Professor Emeritus at the University of Paris-Nanterre, Directeur honoraire of journal Actuel Marx, Paris-PUF, President of the Congres Marx International (Paris), gave a public lecture entitled “A Critical History of Socio-Political Modernity: Foucault, Marx and the Project of Human Emancipation.” The presentation focused on Bidet's theory of modernity in terms of three layers - organization, market and a world system of nation-states. Co-sponsored with the A. E. Havens Center for the Study of Social Structure & Social Change, the Institute for Research in the Humanities, the University Lectures Committee, Department of European Languages & Literatures, and Department of History, the event was held at the Department of History's Curti Lounge at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 8, 2014.

Eleni Varikas, Professor Emerita of Political Theory and Gender Studies at the Université Paris, gave a talk entitled "An Endless Series of Catastrophes' Hannah Arendt, Rosa Luxemburg & the Question of Plurality." The event, co-sponsored with the Havens Center for Social Justice, the event was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on March 26, 2014.

Jane Kamensky, Harry S. Truman Professor of American Civilization at Brandeis University, gave a public lecture entitled "Copley's American War" held at the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on March 3, 2014.

Max Brooks, author of Zombie Armageddon and son of writer-director Mel Brooks, presented a public talk entitled "Apocalyptic Fiction as Social & Political Commentary" and gave an informal presentation in Prof. John Sharpless' History 600 course - From Revelation to Zombies: Apocalyptic Prophesies in Western Histories. Co-sponsored with Wisconsin Union and Department of History, the main public event was held at Union South at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on December 3, 2013.

James C. Scott, Sterling Professor of Political Science, Professor of Anthropology, and Director of Agrarian Studies at Yale University, gave three public lectures at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Scott's first lecture was entitled "Early Stages: The Golden Age of Barbarians," October 24, 2013. His second talk was part of the Hilldale Lecture Series entitled "Four domestications: fire, plants, animals and us, or the late neolithic multi-species resettlement camp" held at UW Memorial Union on October 24, 2013. Scott's third lecture entitled "Some histories of state evasion in Southeast Asia and elsewhere" was for the Center of Southeast Asian Studies Friday Forum held at Ingraham Hall at the University of Wisconsin on October 25, 2013.

Luise White, Professor of African History at the University of Florida, gave a talk entitled "'Racial Representation of the Worst Sort': Southern Rhodesia's 1957 franchise commission, citizenship, and the problem of polygynous wives." This talk drew from White's book project on the history of the African franchise in Rhodesia focusing on the issues of citizenship and the debates about granting vote to the wives of polygynous men. Co-sponsored with the Distinguished Lecturers' Committee, Department of History, Department of History of Medicine, and the African Studies Program, this event was held at the Memorial Library at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on February 28, 2013.

Jim Downs, Associate Professor of History at Connecticut College, gave a talk entitled "Dying to Be Free: The Health Conditions of Freed Slaves During the Civil War and Reconstruction," as part of the UW-Madison's Center for the Humanities' "Emancipation" speakers' series in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Co-sponsored with the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, the event was held at the Memorial Library at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on February 26, 2013.

Vina A. Lanzona (UW alumna, Ph.D in History, 2000), Associate Professor of History and Director of the Center for Philippine Studies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, presented a lecture entitled “Engendering Counterinsurgency: The Battle to Win ‘Hearts and Minds’ of Women during the Huk Rebellion in the Philippines,” as part of the Sociology of Gender’s “Femsem Colloquium.” Co-sponsored with the Center for Research on Gender & Women, Department of Gender & Women’s Studies, Department of Sociology, and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, this event was held in the Sewell Social Sciences Building at the University of Wisconsin on November 1, 2012.

Andrew Hartman, Associate Professor of History at Illinois State University, gave a talk entitled "A Trojan Horse of Social Engineering: The Curriculum Wars in Recent American History." Co-sponsored with the School of Education's Department of Curriculum and Instruction and Department of Educational Policy Studies, this event was held at the Education Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 11, 2012.

Bruce Kuklick, Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, presented a lecture entitled "Death in the Congo: Killing Patrice Lumumba." The presentation focused on Kuklick's (in collaboration with Emmanuel Gerard) forthcoming book on the assassination of Patrice Lumumba, the first Prime Minister of the Republic of the Congo. Co-sponsored with African Studies Program, this event was held at Ingraham Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on September 11, 2012.

Joanne Pottlitzer, NAVE visiting scholar, freelance playwright and director, gave a talk entitled "Symbols of Resistance: The Legacy of Artists Under Pinochet." Co-sponsored with the Latin-American, Caribbean & Iberian Studies (LACIS) Program, the NAVE Fund, Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies, and the Center for Humanities, this event was held at the Social Science Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 25, 2012.

Darryl Holter, a musician, historian and labor organizer from Los Angeles, presented a public lecture entitled "Woody Guthrie in Los Angeles, 1937-1941." Co-sponsored with the Havens Center, the Labor & Working Class Studies Project, and Comparative U.S. Studies (CUSS) Cluster, this event was held at the Mosse Humanities Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 23, 2012.

Richard Wightman Fox, Professor of History at the University of Southern California and the First Annual Curti Visiting Scholar in US Intellectual and Cultural History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, presented a public lecture entitled "Memory-Making on the Ground: Elevating Lincoln to Civic Sainthood in the Spring of 1865" as part of the "Lived Inquiry" Mellon Workshop. Co-sponsored with the Center for Humanities, Department of History, Comparative U.S. Studies (CUSS) Cluster, "Lived Inquiry" Mellon Workshop/Center for Humanities, and the Merle Curti Intellectual and Cultural History Chair funds, this event was held at the University Club at the University of Wisconsin on April 12, 2012.

Jeremy Popkin, T. Marshall Hahn Professor of History at University of Kentucky, presented a public talk entitled "Haiti and the Age of Revolution." Co-sponsored with the Department of History, this event was held at the Department of History's Curti Lounge at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on March 12, 2012.

Kenneth MacLean, Professor of International Development and Social Change Program at Clark University, gave a public lecture as part of the UW-Madison Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS) Friday Forum lecture series entitled "Digital Patriots: Hacking in the Defense of the Vietnamese Nation." Co-sponsored with CSEAS, this event was held at Ingraham Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on February 17, 2012.

Kathryn Robinson, Professor of Anthropology at Australian National University, gave a talk at the UW-Madison Center for Southeast Asian Studies Friday Forum entitled "Modalities of propagation of Islam in the Sulawesi Interior: Lessons for Understanding Islamization in Eastern Indonesia?" Co-sponsored with CSEAS, this event was held at Ingraham Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on November 11, 2011.

Leon Fink, Distinguished Professor of History at University of Illinois-Chicago, presented a public lecture entitled "Cooperation and Cash: How a Global Transport Union Learned to Love Globalization." Co-sponsored with the Havens Center, and Comparative U.S. Studies (CUSS) Cluster, this event was held at the Mosse Humanities Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on November 4, 2010.

Errol Morris (UW alumnus, B.A. in History, 1969), renowned documentary filmmaker, gave a series of talks about his works as part of the event “Elusive Truths: The Cinema of Errol Morris” that included a symposium and film screening of all nine of his feature films through the UW Cinematheque. Co-sponsored with the History Department, and the Communications Arts Department, the event was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 21, 2010.

Heraldo Muñoz, Chilean Ambassador to the United Nations, presented a lecture entitled “From Dictatorship to the Security Council: A Political Memoir.” Co-sponsored with the Center for World Affairs and the Global Economy (WAGE), LACIS’ Nave Fund, Division of International Studies, the Political Science Department, the Human Rights Initiative, the Dane County Chapter of the United Nations, and the University Bookstore, this event was held in the University Club Main Dining Room at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 26, 2009.

Andrew J. Bacevich, Professor of International Relations and History at Boston University, gave a lecture at the Wisconsin Book Festival entitled “The Enduring Relevance of the Wisconsin School: What William A. Williams Got Right and Where He Went Wrong.” Co-sponsored with the Wisconsin Book Festival and the History Department, this event was held in Madison’s Overture Center on October 10, 2009.

Martin Espada (UW alumnus, B.A. in History, 1981), a renowned poet, lawyer and Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, did a poetry reading and took part in two brown-bag discussion sessions on “The Redemption of Pablo Neruda” and “Colonialism and the Poetry of Rebellion.” Co-sponsored with the Center for the Humanities, the Vice-Provost Office, the Office of Multicultural Arts Initiatives, the Department of History, Latin American, Caribbean, Iberian Studies, the Comparative US Cultures Cluster, and Chican@ & Latin@ Studies Program, the events were held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from April 30-May 1, 2009.

Noam Chomsky, Professor Emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, gave a talk entitled “Israel-Palestine from Bush to Obama: Assessing the role of US Foreign Policy, Israeli Security Concerns, and Human Rights in the OPTs” at the Orpheum Theater. In addition, Professor Noam Chomsky spoke before a combined session of “History 342: History of the People’s Republic of China” and “History 456: The Pacific War” in 1800 Engineering Hall. Both events were held on April 7, 2009.

Robert Whitney, Associate Professor of International Studies and History at the University of New Brunswick, St. John, Canada, presented a lecture entitled “British Subjects and ‘Pichones’ in Cuba: The British West Indian Diaspora and Cuban Nationalism, 1920-1960.” Co-sponsored with the Latin American, Caribbean, & Iberian Studies’ NAVE Fund, and the Latin American, Caribbean and Iberian Studies Program (LACIS), the event was held in the Mosse Humanities Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 3, 2009.

Marceline Kongolo-Bice, founder of SOS Femmes en Dangers (an NGO dedicated to supporting the recovery of victims of sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo), gave a guest lecture entitled “Gender and Violence in the Eastern DRC” in Professor Neil Kodesh’s “History 377” class. In a second lecture she spoke to a public audience on “SOS: Women at Risk in Congo Wars” held at Ingraham Hall. These events were held from March 30 to March 31, 2009.

Ana Mariella Bacigalupo, Professor of Anthropology at University of Buffalo, gave series of lectures on Chilean Mapuche shamans and resistance in Chile. Her first talk at the Anthropology colloquium addressed the topic of “Forgetting and the Willful Transformation of Memory: The Death and Rebirth of a Mapuche Shaman in Chile.” Dr. Bacigalupo also lectured at Helen White Hall on December 3 on “The Gendered Shamanization of Mapuche Politics: Resistance and Negotiation with the Chilean State” as a contributor to the Gender and Women’s History workshop. Co-sponsored with the NAVE Visiting Scholars and Artists Fund, the Program in Gender and Women’s History, the Department of Anthropology, and American Indian Studies, these events were held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from December 1 to December 3, 2008.

Micheline Ishay, Professor and Director of the International Human Rights Program at the University of Denver, presented a talk entitled “Back to the Future? The 60th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,” as part of the Fall 2008 Human Rights lecture series. Co-sponsored with UW-Madison Human Rights Initiative, the International Institute, the Global Studies Department, and the Division of International Studies, the event was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on October 27, 2008.

Dorothea Browder, Professor of History at Western Kentucky University, gave a talk entitled “From Uplift to Agitation: Working Women, Race, and Coalition in the YWCA Industrial Program, 1908-1950.” Co-sponsored with the Gender and Women’s History Program and the History Department, the event was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on May 6, 2008.

George Lipsitz (UW alumnus, Ph.D in History), Professor of Black Studies at the University of California-Santa Barbara and chairman of the board of directors of the African American Policy Forum, gave a lecture entitled “Why American Studies Matters: Speaking Truth to Power in the Midnight Hour.” Co-sponsored with the English Department, the Anonymous Fund, and American Studies Collective, the event was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on September 20, 2007.

Nikhil Pal Singh, Associate Professor of History at the University of Washington, presented a lecture on his new book, Black is a Country. The event was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 26, 2007.

Greg Grandin, Professor of History at New York University, delivered the keynote address at the 26th Annual Wisconsin Labor History Society Conference. Co-sponsored with Wisconsin Labor History Society, the event was held in Union South at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 28, 2007.

David Emmons, Professor of History at University of Montana, presented a lecture entitled “The Irish in Butte, Montana: Labor and Capital in the American Mining Company.” Co-sponsored with the Dean of Letters & Science, History Department and the Folklore Program, the event was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on November 15, 2005.

David Emmons, Professor of History at University of Montana, presented lecture entitled “The Irish and Indians in the American West.” Co-sponsored with the Dean of Letters & Science, History Department and the Folklore Program, the event was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on November 14, 2005.

Laura Hein (UW alumna, Ph.D in History, 1986), Professor of History at Northwestern University, gave a talk on the shadows of world war in contemporary Japan at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the fall of 2005.

Alfred W. McCoy, UW Professor of History and Harvey Goldberg co-chair, delivered the “First Annual Harvey Goldberg Lecture” on “Torture and US Foreign Policy” at the dedication of the Harvey Goldberg classroom at the Brecht Forum in New York City on September 30, 2005.

Saul Landau, Director of the Digital Media Programs at California State Polytechnic University-Pomona, presented a talk entitled “US Policy In The 21st Century: From Wilsonian Alliances To The Culture of Naked Power.” Co-sponsored with the Program in Latin American, Caribbean, and Iberian Studies, the event was held in the State Historical Society auditorium on February 25, 2005.

Anna Clark, Professor of History at the University of Minnesota, gave gave a lecture entitled “A Theory of Scandal: The Sexual Politics of the British Constitution,” in the Curti Lounge, University of Wisconsin-Madison on March 6, 2002.

Tom Hayden, political activist, retired California senator, and author, gave two lectures at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His first public talk was entitled “Saving Democracy from Globalization and the War on Terror” in Grainger Hall on October 3, 2002. The second lecture was about relationships between the history of Irish Americans and the conflict in Northern Ireland since the late 1960s--themes addressed in his book Irish on the Inside (published by Verso Press in 2001). This latter event was held at the University Club on October 4, 2002.